ACETAMINOPHEN

  • ACETAMINOPHEN is the active ingredient in Tylenol
  • Acetaminophen is often intentionally given to pets with signs of pain, fever, etc.

Red blood cell can be damaged in cats; liver damage can occur in dogs

  • Acetaminophen toxicity may cause some or all of these symptoms:
  • Depression, salivation, vomiting, rapid breathing, facial swelling, dark gums, death
  • If ingestion is within the last 4-6 hrs and patient is alert:
      1. Induce vomiting by giving hydrogen peroxide orally (1ml/lb, max =45ml)
      2. Give activated charcoal orally (3-6mls/lb)
  • Rush patient to veterinary hospital for further treatment & supportive care

 

AMPHETAMINES

  • AMPHETAMINES are diet pills, prescription drugs & illegal drugs (uppers, speed)
  • Amphetamines are absorbed rapidly from the digestive tract
  • Amphetamines stimulate the nervous system in several ways, and may cause:
  • Flushed skin or pale skin, restlessness, hyperactivity, rapid breathing,
  • muscle tremors, dilated pupils, fever, heart rhythm disturbances
  • If ingestion is within the last 1-2 hrs and patient is alert:
      1. induce vomiting by giving hydrogen peroxide orally (1ml/lb, max=45ml);
      2. Give activated charcoal orally (3-6 mls/lb)
  • Rush patient to veterinary hospital for further treatment & supportive care

 

ANTIFREEZE

  • ANTIFREEZE is one of many substances containing the toxin ETHYLENE GLYCOL
  • Ethylene Glycol is sweet-tasting & rapidly absorbed from the digestive tract
  • Ethylene Glycol is metabolized into substances which cause severe kidney damage
  • Symptoms of ethylene glycol toxicity are progressive, and may include:
  • Initial: depression, weakness & thirst
  • Late: increased salivation, vomiting, anorexia, seizures, coma and death
  • if ingestion is with the last 1-2 hrs and patient is alert:
      1. induce vomiting by giving hydrogen peroxide orally (1ml/lb, max=45ml);
      2. Give activated charcoal orally (3-6 mls/lb)
  • Rush patient to veterinary hospital for further treatment & supportive care

 

ASPIRIN

  • ASPIRIN is often intentionally given to pets with signs of pain, arthritis, etc.
  • Red blood cells can be damaged; bone marrow activity can be suppressed
  • Stomach may become irritated and ulcerated; gastrointestinal bleeding may occur
  • Aspirin toxicity may cause some or all of these symptoms:
  • Depression, weakness, vomiting, rapid heart rate, high temperature, coma death
  • If ingestion is within the last 1-2 hrs and patient is alert:
      1. induce vomiting by giving hydrogen peroxide orally (1ml/lb, max=45ml);
      2. Give activated charcoal orally (3-6 mls/lb)
  • Rush patient to veterinary hospital for further treatment & supportive care

 

BLEACH/LYE

  • BLEACH and LYE are caustic, corrosive chemicals that physically injure tissues
  • Animals rarely ingest enough of these substances to cause problems
  • Caustic chemicals will injure the skin, eyes, nose, mouth, throat, stomach, etc.
  • Symptoms of ingestion may include oral burns, salivation & vomiting
  • If caustic chemicals contact the skin or eyes, flush with water for 30 minutes
  • If caustic chemicals are ingested, DO NOT INDUCE VOMITING
  • Make the pet drink large amounts of water or mild to dilute the ingested chemical
  • If vomiting occurs, keep the pet’s mouth pointed down
  • Rush patient to veterinary hospital for further treatment & supportive care

 

Chocolate

  • CHOCOLATE contains caffeine & theobromine, which act as a potent stimulants
  • Excessive chocolate ingestion is one of the 20 most common poisonings in dogs
  • Poisoning is more common around holidays, when chocolate is more available
  • Caffeine & theobromine can cause excitement, vomiting & diarrhea, followed by:
  • Elevated temperature, muscle stiffness, weakness, increase heart rate,
  • increased breathing rate, coma and death within 12-36 hours after ingestion
  • If ingestion is with the last 1-2 hrs and patient is alert:
      1. induce vomiting by giving hydrogen peroxide orally (1ml/lb, max=45ml);
      2. Give activated charcoal orally (3-6 mls/lb)
  • Rush patient to veterinary hospital for further treatment & supportive care

 

COCAINE

  • COCAINE is an illegal drug with high abuse potential and no approved medical use
  • Cocaine is rapidly absorbed from mucus membranes – eyes, nose, mouth, etc.
  • Cocaine affects many systems in the body, with the following symptoms:
  • Rapid heart rate, abnormal heart rhythm, difficult or rapid breathing,
  • excitement, hyperactivity, seizures, fever, shock, coma, death
  • If ingestion is with the last 1-2 hrs and patient is alert:
      1. induce vomiting by giving hydrogen peroxide orally (1ml/lb, max=45ml);
      2. Give activated charcoal orally (3-6 mls/lb)
  • Rush patient to veterinary hospital for further treatment & supportive care

 

IBUPROFEN

  • IBUPROFEN is an anti-inflammatory medicine found in Advil, Nuprin and others
  • Ibuprofen is often intentionally given to pets with signs of pain, arthritis, etc.
  • Severe stomach and intestinal bleeding may occur; blood lost may be significant
  • Ibuprofen toxicity may cause some or all of these symptoms:
  • Abdominal pain, weakness, vomiting, bloody feces (black or red in color)
  • If ingestion is with the last 1-2 hrs and patient is alert:
      1. induce vomiting by giving hydrogen peroxide orally (1ml/lb, max=45ml);
      2. Give activated charcoal orally (3-6 mls/lb)
  • Rush patient to veterinary hospital for further treatment & supportive care

 

INSECTICIDES

  • INSECTICIDES are in the flea & tick products and in products used by exterminators
  • Insecticides include: permethrins, pyrethrins, organophosphates & carbamates
  • Poisoning occurs when products are absorbed through the skin or ingested
  • Symptoms are often worse in cats, who are less able to metabolize chemicals
  • Insecticides cause overstimulation of nerves, with some or all of these symptoms:
  • Salivation, vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, weakness small pupils, slow heart rate,
  • difficult breathing, muscle twitching, muscle tremors, seizures & death
  • Bathe pet in warm soapy water to remove any insecticide from the coat & skin
  • Keep patient warm, rush to veterinary hospital for further treatment & supportive care

 

LEAD

  • LEAD POISONING occurs after ingestion of paint, batteries, or other forms of lead
  • Poisoning may occur after a single ingestion, or after long-term exposure
  • Lead poisoning can cause some or all of the following symptoms:
  • Digestive system symptoms: vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain
  • Nervous system symptoms: lethargy, head-pressing, hysteria, seizures, blindness
  • Locate and remove source of lead from animal’s environment
  • Transport patient to veterinary hospital for further treatment & supportive care

 

TOXIC MUSHROOMS

  • There are many different kinds of TOXIC MUSHROOMS in the world
  • Specific organ system damage depends on the type of mushroom ingested
  • Mushroom poisoning tends to occur in younger animals, in the Summer & Fall
  • Onset of symptoms can be 30 minutes to 6 hours after ingestion
  • Symptoms will vary with the type of mushroom ingested, and may include:
  • Salivation, vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, jaundice, weakness, seizures & coma
  • If ingestion is with the last 1-2 hrs and patient is alert:
      1. induce vomiting by giving hydrogen peroxide orally (1ml/lb, max=45ml);
      2. Give activated charcoal orally (3-6 mls/lb)
  • Rush patient to veterinary hospital for further treatment & supportive care

 

NARCOTICS

  • NARCOTICS are highly addictive drugs such as opium, heroin, morphine, codeine
  • Symptoms of narcotic toxicity are dose dependent and progressive
  • Initial/low dose: depression, weakness, decreased pain
  • Late/higher dose: delirium, respiratory depression, coma and death
  • If ingestion is with the last 1-2 hrs and patient is alert:
      1. induce vomiting by giving hydrogen peroxide orally (1ml/lb, max=45ml);
      2. Give activated charcoal orally (3-6 mls/lb)
  • If directed by veterinarian, inject Naloxone, Narcan 0.01-0.02 mg/lb IM
  • Antagonist injection lasts less than 1 hour. Repeat as needed
  • Rush patient to veterinary hospital for further treatment & supportive care

 

RAT POISON

  • The most common RAT POISON (rodenticide) is WARFARIN, an anticoagulant
  • ANTICOAGULANT interfere with the body’s ability to make blood clot
  • Rodenticide poisons contain ingredients that make them palatable to dogs
  • Rat poisons contain dyes which will change the color of the feces to green or blue
  • Signs of redenticide poisoning may be delayed for several days and may include:
  • Bleeding, bruising, hematomas, pale gums, weakness, labored breathing
  • If ingestion is with the last 1-2 hrs and patient is alert:
      1. induce vomiting by giving hydrogen peroxide orally (1ml/lb, max=45ml);
      2. Give activated charcoal orally (3-6 mls/lb)
  • Transport patient to veterinary hospital for antidote, supportive care as needed

 

SNAIL BAIT

  • SNAIL BAIT contains METALDEHYDE, which primarily affects the nervous system
  • Metaldehyde is often combined with food ingredients that are palatable to dogs
  • Metaldehyde poisoning affects the nervous & digestive systems, and may cause:
  • salivation, vomiting, diarrhea, dilated pupils, muscle tremors, seizures & coma
  • Death is usually due to respiratory failure, and occurs within 24 hours of ingestion
  • Even if an animal survives the initial phase, it may die of liver failure in 2-3 days
  • If ingestion is within the last 1-2 hrs and patient is not seizuring:
      1. Induce vomiting by giving hydrogen peroxide orally (1ml/lb, max=45ml);
      2. Give activated charcoal orally (3-6 mls/lb)
  • Rush patient to veterinary hospital for further treatment & supportive care

 

SOLVENTS & FUELS

  • SOLVENT S include acetone, benzene, naptha, methylene, toluene, xlene
  • FUELS include oil, gasoline, kerosene, turpentine & lighter fluid
  • Solvents and fuels may be inhaled or ingested, or they may contact the skin
  • Symptoms of inhalation: vomiting, weakness, convulsions, collapse, blue gums
  • Symptoms of ingestion: vomiting, diarrhea, weakness, fixed pupils, coma
  • If these products contact the skin or eyes, flush with large amounts of water
  • If these products are ingested, DO NOT INDUCE VOMITING
  • Make the pet drink water or milk to dilute the ingested chemical
  • If vomiting occurs spontaneously, keep pet’s mouth pointed down
  • Rush patient to veterinary hospital for further treatment & supportive care

 

STRYCHNINE

  • STRYCHNINE is a poison used to exterminate household & agricultural pests
  • Red blood cells can be damaged; bone marrow activity can be suppressed
  • Stomach may become irritated and ulcerated; gastrointestinal bleeding may occur
  • Strychnine poisoning may cause some or all of these symptoms:
  • Depression, weakness, vomiting, rapid heart rate, high temperature, coma, death
  • If ingestion is within the last 1-2 hrs and patient is not seizuring:
      1. Induce vomiting by giving hydrogen peroxide orally (1ml/lb, max=45ml);
      2. Give activated charcoal orally (3-6 mls/lb)
  • Rush patient to veterinary hospital for further treatment & supportive care